New York City Cemeteries:
Green-Wood Cemetery (2)Fifth Avenue and 25th Street, Brooklyn 
"Once called “the largest and handsomest [cemetery] in the vicinity of New York.” Green-Wood’s beauty ultimately inspired the contest to design Manhattan’s Central Park. Designed by David Bates Douglass…the 478-acre cemetery was seen “as a rural retreat where visitors could contemplate death as a reconciliation with nature.” Douglass’ plan included trees, flowers, paths with views of Manhattan and New York Harbor. Richard Upjohn, architect of Trinity Church, designed the Main Gate. Erected in 1861, the gate was made of brownstone and crowned with multi-colored slate shingles. Spires, turrets, finials, crockets, and gables distinguished the structure in the gothic revival style."
Map: Robinson’s atlas of the city of Brooklyn (1886)
Text: The Graveyard Shift : a family historian’s guide to New York City cemeteries

New York City Cemeteries:

Green-Wood Cemetery (2)
Fifth Avenue and 25th Street, Brooklyn

"Once called “the largest and handsomest [cemetery] in the vicinity of New York.” Green-Wood’s beauty ultimately inspired the contest to design Manhattan’s Central Park. Designed by David Bates Douglass…the 478-acre cemetery was seen “as a rural retreat where visitors could contemplate death as a reconciliation with nature.” Douglass’ plan included trees, flowers, paths with views of Manhattan and New York Harbor. Richard Upjohn, architect of Trinity Church, designed the Main Gate. Erected in 1861, the gate was made of brownstone and crowned with multi-colored slate shingles. Spires, turrets, finials, crockets, and gables distinguished the structure in the gothic revival style."

Map: Robinson’s atlas of the city of Brooklyn (1886)

Text: The Graveyard Shift : a family historian’s guide to New York City cemeteries