Greenwich Village: “Sapokanikan” – “Noortwijck” – “Groenwyck” “As the name implies, Greenwich Village was once a country hamlet, a rural village located two miles north of the original seventeenth century Manhattan settlement. Before the acquisition of Manhattan by the Dutch in 1609, the area we call Greenwich Village was a Lenape Indian village known as Sapokanikan, meaning “Tobacco Field”…And indeed tobacco was cultivated there. In 1629, Wouter Van Twiller, a clerk working for the Dutch West India Company and who later served as director of New Amsterdam (between 1633 and 1638), was granted the rights to two hundred acres located at and around what is now Gansevoort Street, where he established a tobacco farm…The Dutch called this corner of Manhattan “Noortwijck,” or “Noortwyck,” meaning Northern District, a name that was soon changed to “Groenwijk,” Green District, probably due to its pastoral beauty. With the transfer of ownership of Manhattan Island to the English in 1664, the name Groenwijck was Anglicized and became “Greenwich.”
Text: Exploring the Original West Village by Alfred Pommer and Eleanor Winters (2011)Map: Indian paths in the great metropolis / Reginald Pelham Bolton [NYC Historical]

Greenwich Village: “Sapokanikan” – “Noortwijck” – “Groenwyck”
“As the name implies, Greenwich Village was once a country hamlet, a rural village located two miles north of the original seventeenth century Manhattan settlement. Before the acquisition of Manhattan by the Dutch in 1609, the area we call Greenwich Village was a Lenape Indian village known as Sapokanikan, meaning “Tobacco Field”…And indeed tobacco was cultivated there. In 1629, Wouter Van Twiller, a clerk working for the Dutch West India Company and who later served as director of New Amsterdam (between 1633 and 1638), was granted the rights to two hundred acres located at and around what is now Gansevoort Street, where he established a tobacco farm…The Dutch called this corner of Manhattan “Noortwijck,” or “Noortwyck,” meaning Northern District, a name that was soon changed to “Groenwijk,” Green District, probably due to its pastoral beauty. With the transfer of ownership of Manhattan Island to the English in 1664, the name Groenwijck was Anglicized and became “Greenwich.”

Text: Exploring the Original West Village by Alfred Pommer and Eleanor Winters (2011)
Map: Indian paths in the great metropolis / Reginald Pelham Bolton [NYC Historical]